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Springing Into Listening Activities

Spring is in the air, school breaks are coming up soon, and attention wanders from class work to thoughts of getting outside and having fun. To help keep those listening skills sharp, I have varied offerings for teachers today: three for elementary students, and one freebie for upper grades to high school.  Parents are encouraged to modify and use any of these activities at home. 

For elementary students, here are listening activities that incorporate academics. In order of estimated difficulty:

 

WHO’S MY PARTNER?          apples png

This listening activity focuses on counting and numeral recognition.

  • Split the students into two teams (for to 20 players).
  • Give one team secret papers that have from one to ten dots.
  • Give the other team secret papers that have the numerals from one to ten.
  • One at a time, have the students with the dots each knock that number of times on a table and ask, “Who is my partner?”
  • The student with the matching numeral responds, “I am number____.”

 

 

SPARKLE!    spelling

This focuses on critical listening and serves as practice for the week’s (or previous weeks’) spelling words.  

  • The teacher arranges students in a line. (This can be done with students standing beside their desks, if they are in rows; or standing in a circle.) Then the teacher calls out the first spelling word.
  • The first student in line calls out the first letter in that word.
  • The second person calls out the second letter.
  • The third person calls out the third letter and so on.
  • The person who says the last letter in the word must turn to the next person in the sequence and say “SPARKLE.”
  • The person who is “sparkled” must sit down.
  • If a word is misspelled, the person to say the first wrong letter must sit down and the spelling of that word continues.
  • After a student is sparkled, the leader calls out a new word.
  • The game continues until only one student remains standing, then all students stand back up and the teacher calls out the next word.

Adapted from Source: Gary Hopkins, Education World; http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/field_day_games.shtml#sthash.eSt5XI7u.dpuf.   

 

ONE, TWO, THREE, BUZZ!         bee-1296273_960_720

This listening activity focuses on math multiplication facts.         

  • Start in a circle by counting aloud, each student taking a turn, going around the circle to get familiar with the counting movement.
  • The teacher then calls out a change–a number that represent its multiplication table. Numbers of that multiplication table will be replaced with the word BUZZ.
  • For example, replacing numbers in the 5 times table with BUZZ instead of the actual number: 1, 2, 3, 4, BUZZ, 6, 7, 8, 9, BUZZ, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, BUZZ.

Source: The Drama Toolkit. (2015). Drama Games: Listening. http://www.dramatoolkit.co.uk.

 

For UPPER GRADES to HIGH SCHOOL, here’s a listening strategy for teaching listening and attending skills. Click to download the freebie: FOCUS

Happy Springtime!                                                                      © 2017 Susanne Marie Poulette

 

 

 

 

Freebie: Liam’s Listening Poster

Here’s a January gift for you and your students!  Download Liam Labradoodle’s Whole Body Listening diagram poster for your classroom. Feel free to reduce the size and print copies for each students’ desk. These can be good reminders for active listening and paying attention. 

Whether you’re new to this site or a returning reader, please check us out for other free downloadables as well as lots of listening resources for Pre K to Middle Grades. I hope you’ll follow this site! 

Click the image for Liam’s poster:

liam-map-in-pub

Enjoy!

From: Liam Labradoodle Learns Whole Body Listening, Maminet Press, 2015

© SM Poulette 1/2017

Talking with Kids about Listening Filters

by Susanne M. Poulette, MS, CCC-SLP

Let’s talk about listening filters. We all know the signs, and no doubt we’ve been there. We may be in a public place and hear an announcement, and as soon as we identify that the message doesn’t pertain to us, we tune it right out. It could happen during a conversation or when listening to a speaker. We may drift off, not because we’re  tired or distracted, but because we’ve actively decided to block the message, for any number of reasons. We might be opposed to the speaker or the topic, we may think it doesn’t apply, or maybe we just don’t want to hear what we know is coming. 

What about our students? When we get exasperated with continually asking for attention, and redirecting them to listening…it might be worth exploring why they’re not listening and if they are filtering you out. 

Here’s my simple chart to help you get started in talking with your students about listening filters; what they are, and how to recognize and resolve them. I hope this is a good jumping off point for discussion and lots of problem solving with your students.

 Go ahead- click, download and print, it’s a freebie!

listening-filters-sm-poulette

© S M Poulette 2017